• French_Hero_1.jpg
  • French_Hero_2.jpg
  • French_Hero_3.jpg
  • French_Hero_4.jpg
  • Hero_0000_Layer 4.jpg
  • Hero_0001_Layer 3.jpg
  • Hero_0002_Layer 2.jpg
  • Hero_0003_Layer 1.jpg
You are here: Home / News / Amy Copley, senior in French and Int'l Politics,writes about her experience in Senegal improving food security.
French Studies on Twitter
 

Amy Copley, senior in French and Int'l Politics,writes about her experience in Senegal improving food security.

Although our bountiful planet produces enough food for every man, woman, and child on earth—due to imbalances in our global food production systems—one in seven people do not get the food they need to live a healthy, active life. This paradox of want in a world of abundance has perplexed me throughout my academic career, and is what motivated me to study abroad in Senegal, a West African country, where a quarter of the population suffers from hunger or malnutrition.

Although our bountiful planet produces enough food for every man, woman, and child on earth—due to imbalances in our global food production systems—one in seven people do not get the food they need to live a healthy, active life. This paradox of want in a world of abundance has perplexed me throughout my academic career, and is what motivated me to study abroad in Senegal, a West African country, where a quarter of the population suffers from hunger or malnutrition. By spending a semester in Senegal, I hoped to develop a deeper understanding of the obstacles related to achieving domestic food security, and learn how the government, international organizations, and local non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are working to overcome these challenges.

Continue reading about Amy's experiences here!

project photo collage